Untitled Poem by Raven Rix

Some say it’s a sanctuary

Some say it’s a paradise

And while this place is truly all these

It is more

It is a realm

But most of all,

It is where I go

When I am so

So

Thirsty

 

–Ravin Rix, 9th grade

Submitted by Terri Clark of the Smoky Hill Library in the Arapahoe Library District, who says: “I run a creative writing program for teens out of the Smoky Hill Library and had them use poetry in the stacks as a writing prompt.”

Books by Beverley George

Books TTJ tr Aya Yuhki (2)

(Click on the poem to view larger)

English Version:

Books

Beverley George

 

dinner sets, fine linen,

and cooking pots scatter . . .

my books

come with me everywhere

from home, to home, to home

 

Pooh Bear tales

loved now as in childhood —

on the flyleaf

my name in mother’s writing,

and a stamp I coloured in

 

e-books have their place

in our speeding, shrinking world

I luxuriate

in silken pages to turn

and sturdy, sewn spines

 

books arranged

by genre, country, author

are easy to find

my life as a librarian

flows into golden years

 

book jackets

gleam in lamplight

gateways

to realms of otherness,

the maze of diverse minds

© Beverley George

published bilingually The Tanka Journal [Japan] no. 43 2013  p.19

Beverley George has spent most of her working life in libraries, mostly scientific ones, but she has also enjoyed time in public libraries, including a country children’s book service. Her private copious bookshelves reflect a lifelong love of books, which are arranged systematically for easy retrieval.
She greatly enjoys the Japanese poetic genres and produces Eucalypt: a tanka journal,  in print, on Hanno silk paper.

Sparrows Beneath Eaves [Homeless beside the State Library] by Beverley George

Sparrows Beneath Eaves

[Homeless beside the State Library]

 

Swish of passing cars

and the long stains

of traffic lights

across gleaming macadam.

 

His upturned collar lets in drips

from the window glazing

that separates him

from warm-jacketed books

and winking necklaces of computer LED,

sly as bandy-bandy snakes.

 

The eaves here are wide.

Often rain does not reach his wall;

he glares at its encroachment,

a red-eyed Canute, cursing god and man                      

 

Bundles of rags and newspaper

mark the proximity of others;

strictures of survival

prohibit intimacy.

 

In early light the sparrows

flit down in twos and threes

to shake and strut in puddles,

fossick for damp crumbs.

 

He stretches night-cramped muscles,

and stoops to roll his blanket.

All that he possesses

becomes the new day’s burden.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Beverley:

‘Sparrows Beneath Eaves’ highly commended in the Jean Stone Award 2006;

published in Poetrix #26  2007  and in an anthology of my work:

Drawing God and other pastimes  by Beverley George.  Picaro Press, 2009

 

Beverley George has spent most of her working life in libraries, mostly scientific ones, but she has also enjoyed time in public libraries, including a country children’s book service. Her private copious bookshelves reflect a lifelong love of books, which are arranged systematically for easy retrieval.
She greatly enjoys the Japanese poetic genres and produces Eucalypt: a tanka journal,  in print, on Hanno silk paper.

 

Two from Darien Library in Connecticut

These two poems come to us from Lisa, the Children’s Librarian at the Darien Library in Connecticut. Lisa was actually the FIRST person I had contact me about submissions, and she put up a display at her library to create interest and engage her community!

Thank you, Lisa!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Untitled

– Miss Jeanne Altman, Darien Library

 

I love my library,

It’s my favorite place.

It has books and videos and a makerspace.

I love my librarians,

They are always so great.

They lend me Timmy Failure and Joshua Dread and even Big Nate.

I love my library,

The programs are fun.

We have science and TEA crafts and books in the sun.

Libraries and librarians,

Who would have guessed?

That I would think both of them are the best!

 

 

The Library

-Charlotte S., 10 years old

The library is such a fun place

I pick out books with grace

As I look at the spines and face the titles

I might stare for a while

I as this place is so much I have to go I’ve run out of space

 

 

 

Date-Stamp by Julie Thorndyke

DATE-STAMP

September gone
and another birthday
I pause
before turning the fourth
corner of the year

these book-lined walls
all thought, every emotion
contained
on my calendar I schedule
a day to run free

last day of term
locking the library door
on silence
I check myself out

for a long, long loan

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

a TANKA SPLENDOR 2006 winner, published on

http://www.ahapoetry.com/ts2006.htm

Julie Thorndyke lives, works and writes in Sydney, Australia. Two collections of her tanka poetry, rick rack and Carving Granite, are available from Ginninderra Press. http://www.ginninderrapress.com.au/ 

Online learning By Julie Thorndyke

Online learning

 

email instructions…

a web-based learning platform—

how can he

chat up female students

in this virtual classroom?

 

no hiding

from the virtual librarian

if the overdue notices

don’t find you, she has

an avatar to hunt you down

 

pixelated…

confabulated by email

he longs

for the sound

of a human voice

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Julie Thorndyke lives, works and writes in Sydney, Australia. Two collections of her tanka poetry, rick rack and Carving Granite, are available from Ginninderra Press. http://www.ginninderrapress.com.au/

This day by Kay Syrad

This day

 

It is a quarter to six, already light, I am trembling

and I say ‘I wish you didn’t—.’ ‘I don’t,’ you say.

‘But you’re always—.’ ‘I don’t—I do not.’

 

I go downstairs, make a pot of tea, choose mugs,

pour milk.  He appears.  ‘I don’t.’ Very slowly

he presses tobacco on to a paper, licks, rolls,

 

goes outside to smoke. ‘I don’t,’ he says, through

the doorway. We are at the threshold—again

and I drive to the station wearing dark glasses.

 

At the archive, the course leader greets us, one

by one; we listen and speak, raise the kept letters

from their boxes. The air thickens as we dwell,

 

not finding what we want, wanting what we find.

I hold the breathing paper up to the light—

her writing slants this way and on the other side

 

that way, just like the thoughts. ‘No one can know

another person,’ she writes. ‘He said I am—, but

I am not. I am not—and I am striving for patience.’

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Kay Syrad is a poet and novelist from Sussex in England.  Her poetry collection, Double Edge (Pighog, 2012) has been described as a ‘sophisticated and accomplished  first collection where knowledge is never merely knowing but lit with unexpected insights and human sympathy.’ Kay’s novel, The Milliner and the Phrenologist was published by Cinnamon Press in 2009 and her new novel, Send, is forthcoming from Cinnamon in October 2015. For this novel, which is partly autobiographical, Kay worked with an artist and a dancer to explore what and how the body remembers. Kay often collaborates with other artists: in 2013 she was the commissioned writer on an art project about the history of our coastal lightships (Last Station) and her artist’s book, work of the lightship men: 1000 tasks, was purchased by the National Maritime Museum in London for their permanent collection.

A note from Kay:

In March and April this year, I attended a four-day course entitled ‘An Anthropology of Ourselves: Exploring Mass Observation for Creative Projects’, during which time creative practitioners were invited to study sections of the Mass Observation Archive at their new state-of-the-art home, The Keep, opened by the Queen in November 2013. The idea was that we used the diaries, written by ordinary people in response to ‘directives’ on certain days of the year, or in response to a phenomenon (such as the second world war), to inspire a project that would bring the amazing and long term resource of these archives out to the community.  The group has a follow up day in September to discuss work in progress on these creative projects.

The short course was run by Dr. Sam Carroll under the auspices of the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research http://www.sussex.ac.uk/clhlwr/ at the University of Sussex.

Here is a link to the Mass Obs archive:  http://www.massobs.org.uk/menu_about_mass_observation.htm  and The Keep http://www.thekeep.info/learning-at-the-keep//

My Library by Varda One

 

It’s only a room with shelves and books,
but it’s far more magical than it looksIt’s a jet on which I soar
to lands that exist no more.

Or a key with which I find
answers to questions crowding my mind.

Building my habit of learning and growing,
asking and researching till I reach knowing.

Here, I’ve been a mermaid and an elf
I’ve even learned to be more myself.

I think that I shall never see
a place that’s been more useful to me.

With encouraging kind friends with wit
Who tell me to dream big and never quit.

It’s only a room with shelves and books,
but it’s far more magical than it looks.

 

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